Famous Swedish Chemists

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 1 
Alfred Nobel
(Swedish Chemist, Engineer, and Inventor Who Invented Dynamite)
Alfred Nobel
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Birthdate: October 21, 1833
Sun Sign: Libra
Birthplace: Stockholm, Sweden
Died: December 10, 1896

Alfred Nobel was a Swedish chemist, engineer, and inventor. A prolific inventor, he held 355 different patents. Most popular as the inventor of dynamite, he was concerned with how he would be remembered after his death and bequeathed his fortune to the Nobel Prize institution. A wide traveler, he was proficient in several languages.

 2 
Svante Arrhenius
(Scientist)
Svante Arrhenius
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Birthdate: February 19, 1859
Sun Sign: Pisces
Birthplace: Vik
Died: October 2, 1927

Svante Arrhenius was a Swedish scientist who became the first Swedish person to win a Nobel Prize when he won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1903. Although he was originally a physicist, Arrhenius is widely accepted as a chemist and is best remembered for co-founding physical chemistry. Stockholm University houses the Arrhenius Labs, which is named in his honor.

 3 
Jöns Jacob Berzelius
(Chemist, Non-fiction writer, University teacher)
Jöns Jacob Berzelius
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Birthdate: August 20, 1779
Sun Sign: Leo
Birthplace: Östergötland
Died: August 7, 1848

Jöns Jacob Berzelius was a Swedish chemist who is often counted among the founders of modern chemistry alongside Robert Boyle, Antoine Lavoisier, and John Dalton. He is also referred to as the Father of Swedish Chemistry. Jöns Jacob Berzelius is also credited with making immense contributions to the field of stoichiometry. In 1836, he was honored with the Copley Medal.

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 4 
Carl Wilhelm Scheele
(Swedish German Chemist Who Discovered Oxygen)
Carl Wilhelm Scheele
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Birthdate: December 9, 1742
Sun Sign: Sagittarius
Birthplace: Stralsund, Germany
Died: May 21, 1786

Born to a German merchant, Carl Wilhelm Scheele was initially trained as a pharmacist but later switched to chemistry. He began his academic career in Sweden. He is best known for discovering oxygen, apart from countless chemical elements such as barium and chlorine and many organic acids.

 5 
Georg Brandt
(Swedish Chemist and Mineralogist Who Discovered 'Cobalt')
Georg Brandt
2
Birthdate: June 26, 1694
Sun Sign: Cancer
Birthplace: Riddarhyttan, Sweden
Died: April 29, 1768

Georg Brandt was a Swedish mineralogist and chemist best remembered for discovering cobalt. He is also credited with identifying and exposing fraudulent alchemists. Georg Brandt also served as a professor at Uppsala University.

 6 
Theodor Svedberg
(Swedish Chemist and Nobel Laureate for His Research on Colloids and Proteins Using the Ultracentrifuge)
Theodor Svedberg
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Birthdate: August 30, 1884
Sun Sign: Virgo
Birthplace: Valbo, Sweden
Died: February 25, 1971
Prominent Swedish chemist Theodor Svedberg received the 1926 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his research on colloids chemistry and invention of ultracentrifuge. For his work, he was named a Foreign Member of the Royal Society and a member of the National Academy of Science too. A student at the University of Uppsala, he later became the physical chemistry head there.
 7 
Arne Tiselius
(Biochemist)
Arne Tiselius
2
Birthdate: August 10, 1902
Sun Sign: Leo
Birthplace: Stockholm
Died: October 29, 1971

Well-known Swedish biochemist Arne Tiselius won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry (1948) for his research on electrophoresis and adsorption analysis, especially for discoveries related to the complex nature of serum proteins. During his career, he worked as a biochemistry professor at the Uppsala University, chaired the Swedish Natural Science Research Council and also became the president of the Nobel Foundation. 

 8 
Axel Fredrik Cronstedt
(Swedish Mineralogist and Chemist Who Discovered the Element 'Nickel')
Axel Fredrik Cronstedt
1
Birthdate: December 23, 1722
Sun Sign: Capricorn
Birthplace: Turinge socken, Sweden
Died: August 19, 1765

Axel Fredrik Cronstedt was a Swedish chemist and mineralogist. He is best remembered for discovering nickel in 1751. Widely regarded as a founder of modern mineralogy, Cronstedt is credited with introducing the blowpipe for mineralogists. In 1753, Axel Fredrik Cronstedt was inducted into the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

 9 
Torbern Bergman
(Swedish Chemist and Mineralogist Known for His Research on the Chemistry of Metals, Especially 'Bismut'h and 'Nickel')
Torbern Bergman
1
Birthdate: March 20, 1735
Sun Sign: Pisces
Birthplace: Katrineberg, Låstad parish, Sweden
Died: July 8, 1784

Torbern Olof Bergman was a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He is best remembered for his 1775 work Dissertation on Elective Attractions, which contains the largest chemical affinity tables. He also contributed immensely to the development of quantitative analysis. Torbern Olof Bergman also taught physics and mathematics at the University of Uppsala.

 10 
Hans von Euler-Chelpin
1
Birthdate: February 15, 1873
Sun Sign: Aquarius
Birthplace: Augsburg
Died: November 6, 1964

In 1929, German-born Swedish biochemist Hans von Euler-Chelpin was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, together with Arthur Harden, for their studies on the fermentation of sugar and fermentative enzymes. An alumnus of the Berlin University, he worked as a general and organic chemistry professor at Stockholm University and was later also appointed the director of its new biochemical institute.

 11 
Per Teodor Cleve
(Swedish Chemist Best Known for His Discovery of the Chemical Elements 'Holmium' and 'Thulium')
Per Teodor Cleve
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Birthdate: February 10, 1840
Sun Sign: Aquarius
Birthplace: Stockholm, Sweden
Died: June 18, 1905

Per Teodor Cleve was a Swedish biologist, chemist, oceanographer, and mineralogist. He is best remembered for his discovery of holmium and thulium. He is also credited with discovering aminonaphthalenesulfonic acids. Per Teodor Cleve is also remembered for his service as professor of general and agricultural chemistry at Uppsala University. His contributions were honored with the Davy Medal.

 12 
Johan Gottlieb Gahn
(Swedish Chemist and Metallurgist Known for Discovery of 'Manganese')
Johan Gottlieb Gahn
1
Birthdate: August 19, 1745
Sun Sign: Leo
Birthplace: Voxna, Sweden
Died: December 8, 1818

Johan Gottlieb Gahn was a Swedish metallurgist and chemist best remembered for discovering manganese in 1774. He is also credited with introducing improvements in copper smelting. In 1784, Johan Gottlieb Gahn was inducted into the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

 13 
Carl Gustaf Mosander
(Swedish Chemist Who Discovered the Rare Earth Elements Lanthanum, Erbium and Terbium)
Carl Gustaf Mosander
1
Birthdate: September 10, 1797
Sun Sign: Virgo
Birthplace: Kalmar, Sweden
Died: October 15, 1858

A Swedish chemist, Carl Gustaf Mosander is recognised for discovering rare earth element - lanthanum, erbium and terbium. He worked a lot with well-known Swedish chemist J. J. Berzelius as his assistant, became a curator of minerals at the Stockholm Academy of Sciences and later also worked as a professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy in the Karolinska Institute.

 14 
Anders Gustav Ekeberg
(Swedish Chemist Who Discovered 'Tantalum')
Anders Gustav Ekeberg
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Birthdate: January 16, 1767
Sun Sign: Capricorn
Birthplace: Stockholm, Sweden
Died: February 11, 1813

Swedish analytical chemist Anders Gustav Ekeberg is primarily known for his discovery of tantalum in 1802. He first studied at and later taught at the University of Uppsala. He was also a member of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. In 2018, Tantalum-Niobium International Study Center started an award in his name to acknowledge work in the field of tantalum research. 

 15 
Peter Jacob Hjelm
0
Birthdate: October 2, 1746
Sun Sign: Libra
Birthplace: Sunnerbo, Sweden
Died: October 7, 1813

Peter Jacob Hjelm was a Swedish chemist best remembered for isolating the element molybdenum; he became the first person to do so in 1781, four years after it was discovered by Carl Wilhelm Scheele. In 1784, Peter Jacob Hjelm was inducted into the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.